Jack Dongarra talks

Jack Dongarra talks

HPCG: One Year Later, ISC14, June 26, 2014, Leipzig Germany.
Fault Tolerance in Numerical Library Routines, ISC14, June 26, 2014, Leipzig Germany.
Overview of High Performance Computing, SC13, UTK Booth talk, November 19, 2013, Denver, CO.
A New (Another) Metric for Ranking HigH Performance Computing Systems, SC13, Top500 BoF talk, November 19, 2013, Denver, CO.
Architecture-aware Algorithms and Software for Peta and Exascale Computing, SC13, Nvidia Booth talk, November 20, 2013, Denver, CO.
Toward a New (Another) Metric for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems, International Supercomputing Conference, June 24, 2013, Leipzig, Germany.
Overview of High Performance Computing, SC13, UTK Booth talk, November 19, 2013, Denver, CO.
Architecture-aware Algorithms and Software for Peta and Exascale Computing, SC13, Nvidia Booth talk, November 20, 2013, Denver, CO.
Emerging Heterogeneous Technologies for High Performance Computing, 22nd International Heterogeneity in Computing Workshop, IPDPS, May 20, 2013, Boston, MA.
The History of the Argonne Advanced Computing Research Facility, Thirty years of Parallel Computing at Argonne, Argonne National Lab, May 14-15, 2013.
Algorithmic and Software Challenges when Moving Towards Exascale, 4th International Supercomputing Conference in Mexico (ISUM 2013) Manzanillo, Mexico, March 6, 2013.
-2012-
On the Future of High Performance Computing: How to Think for Peta and Exascale Computing, Saudi Arabian High Performance Computing Users’ Group Conference, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, December 1, 2012.
On the Future of High Performance Computing: How to Think for Peta and Exascale Computing, The SPEEDUP Society, The Swiss forum for Grid and High Performance Computing, September 7, 2012.
Experience on Multipetaflops Architectures, 2012 Smoky Mountains Computational Science and Engineering Conference, September 5, 2012,
On the Future of High Performance Computing: How to Think for Peta and Exascale Computing, SCI Institute, University of Utah, February 10, 2012,

Blaise Barney, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Introduction to Parallel Computing

Blaise Barney, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Introduction to Parallel Computing
Designing Parallel ProgramsAutomatic vs. Manual ParallelizationUnderstand the Problem and the ProgramPartitioningCommunicationsSynchronizationData DependenciesLoad BalancingGranularityI/OLimits and Costs of Parallel ProgrammingPerformance Analysis and TuningParallel ExamplesArray ProcessingPI CalculationSimple Heat Equation1-D Wave Equation

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09 f9 11 02 9d 74 e3 5b d8 41 56 c5 63 56 88 c0

Gro├če Unruhe w/ dieser Hex-Zahl zur Decodierung von HD-DVD

Discovering the HD-DVD processing key is *NOT* about piracy. Professional pirates don’t gain anything by the discovery of a processing key. You don’t need the processing key in order to make a bit for bit copy of an HD-DVD to sell on the streets. Although it’s true that the key can be used for piracy, its main intrinsic value remains movie playback. So if this isn’t mainly about piracy, what is it about? It’s about licensing. The movie industry wants full control over which movies I watch, when and where I watch them, and what ‘approved’ players I use to view them with.

I use Linux. Exclusively. I don’t even own a copy of Microsoft Windows. Since Linux is composed of free software, do you think that there is some free software that can play HD-DVDs (before the DRM was cracked)? Nope. If I want to watch a movie that I legally purchase from Wal-Mart on my laptop, who’s the MPAA/AACSLA to tell me that I can’t? By encrypting the contents of the disk, they are essentially telling me that they don’t want me to watch the movies I legally purchased from them. And yet, do they have that right? I don’t think so. They haven’t made me sign any licensing agreement. When I buy an HD-DVD from Wal-Mart, I buy it like I would buy a case of Coca-Cola, and there’s absolutely no implied licencing agreement for that. With movies, you don’t even see the shady tactics that computer software uses, such as “Shrink-Wrap” licencing agreements, where you don’t know what you’re agreeing to until after you purchase the software and unrwrap it.