TinkerForge

TinkerForge

Building blocks with a wide range of modules
The well matched Tinkerforge modules allow experienced programmers to concentrate on the software, thus projects can be completed faster. A programming novice on the other hand has the possibility to learn programming with exciting applications by using the Tinkerforge building blocks.

No detailed knowledge in electronics necessary
The realization of a project with Tinkerforge is possible without troubles. You simply pick the required modules and connect them together with each other. There is no other electronics knowledge and no soldering needed.
For example: If the project is to control a motor dependent on a measured temperature, you just have to choose a temperature sensor and an appropriate motor controller out of the available Tinkerforge building blocks.

Intuitive API
The Tinkerforge API offers intuitive functions, that simplify the programming. For example: It is possible to set the velocity of a motor in meters per second with a call of setVelocity() or to read out a temperature in degree Celsius (°C) with getTemperature().

sitepoint.com: A Comparison of JavaScript Linting Tools

sitepoint.com: A Comparison of JavaScript Linting Tools

  1. JSLint
  2. JSHint
  3. JSCS
  4. ESLint

My choice of these four is ESLint. JSLint is strict and not configurable, whereas JSHint is lacking the extension mechanism. JSCS is a good choice if you only want to check coding style, but ESLint does that and it checks your code for bugs and other problems as well.

ESLint is also the obvious choice if you want to use ES6 (or ES2015, as they seem to be calling it now). Of all the tools mentioned, it has the widest support for ES6 features.

If you want to try ESLint, I’ve made it really easy for you by creating a 5-step quick start guide. You can download the ESLint 5-step quickstart guide from my website.

JSHint is strong second choice. If you don’t need the advanced features of ESLint, JSHint catches a good number of issues once properly configured. JSCS, with its huge number of available rules, is a top pick if you don’t need anything other than coding style checks (indentation, braces, etc.).

I’m hesitant to recommend JSLint at all. The other tools do the same things, but don’t force any specific rules on the user. The only exception here is if you happen to agree with all the rules it enforces, in which case it might well be worth looking into.

A linting tool is a good step towards catching problems, but it only sees as many errors as its rules permit. For a more foolproof automated bug-catcher, I recommend using unit tests. Code reviews can also be useful for this purpose.

Mary Rose Cook

Mary Rose Cook

Mary works at Hacker School and lives in New York City.

Gitlet: Git implemented in 1000 lines of JavaScript. I wrote Gitlet to demonstrate how Git works under the covers. The code is heavily annotated.

Little Lisp: A Lisp interpreter in JavaScript. Supports if, let, lambdas and closures. I explained the code in this article and this screencast.

amcharts.com: JavaScript Charts and Maps

amcharts.com: JavaScript Charts and Maps

amCharts is an advanced charting library that will suit any data visualization need. Our charting solution include Column, Bar, Line, Area, Step, Step without risers, Smoothed line, Candlestick, OHLC, Pie/Donut, Radar/ Polar, XY/Scatter/Bubble, Bullet, Funnel/Pyramid charts as well as Gauges. Read More Our charts is a completely standalone and independent library, which doesn’t require any 3rd party includes. You can download, try and even use our charts for free. Check chart demos to see all the charts in action.

samy.pl: evercookie – virtually irrevocable persistent cookies

samy.pl: evercookie – virtually irrevocable persistent cookies
evercookie is a javascript API available that produces extremely persistent cookies in a browser. Its goal is to identify a client even after they’ve removed standard cookies, Flash cookies (Local Shared Objects or LSOs), and others. evercookie accomplishes this by storing the cookie data in several types of storage mechanisms that are available on the local browser. Additionally, if evercookie has found the user has removed any of the types of cookies in question, it recreates them using each mechanism available. Specifically, when creating a new cookie, it uses the following storage mechanisms when available: – Standard HTTP Cookies – Local Shared Objects (Flash Cookies) – Silverlight Isolated Storage – Storing cookies in RGB values of auto-generated, force-cached PNGs using HTML5 Canvas tag to read pixels (cookies) back out – Storing cookies in Web History – Storing cookies in HTTP ETags